Work-Related Injuries FAQ:

What steps should I take after I've been involved in a work-related accident?

  1. Report the accident to your employer (within 14 days of the accident is ideal)

  2. Seek medical treatment, in California you may see your personal physician as your treating doctor but only if:​​

    1. Your employer provides regular health care coverage​

    2. You have given your employer written notice (predesignation) that you want your personal physician to address all future work-related injuries

  3. Document everything, especially potential witnesses

  4. Decline to give statements

  5. Call an attorney

 

Why should I call an attorney if there is Worker's Compensation?

 Injuries that are not Clearly work-related,  require significant medical treatment, or result in permanent disability may require a lawyer to best fight for your case. Some other reasons to hire an attorney are:

  1. Your worker's compensation claim is denied

  2. You're unable to get the treatment you need

  3. Your permanent disability rating is disputed

  4. You're having a worker's compensation hearing

As is the case for any personal-injury type situation, there is no financial downside to hiring an attorney. You pay no up-front fees, and pay nothing if your attorney does not win your case. 

What are the benefits of Worker's Compensation?

  • Medical Care: Paid for by your employer, to help you recover from an injury or illness caused by work.

  • Temporary disability benefits: Payments if you lose wages because your injury prevents you from doing your usual job while recovering.

  • Permanent disability benefits: Payments if you don’t recover completely.

  • Supplemental job displacement benefits (if your date of injury is in 2004 or later): Vouchers to help pay for retraining or skill enhancement if you don’t recover completely and don’t return to work for your employer.

  • Death benefits: Payments to your spouse, children or other dependents if you die from a job injury or illness.